SIGCSE 2011 Logo

SIGCSE 2011: Reaching Out
The 42nd ACM Technical Symposium on
Computer Science Education
March 9-12, 2011, Dallas, Texas, USA
http://www.sigcse.org/sigcse2011/

SIGCSE 2011 Pre-Symposium Events

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am to 3:30pm.

Chris Stephenson, CSTA Executive Director

Participants will learn how to appropriately review and classify resources submitted for entry in to the Source Web Repository.

Contact: Christina San Filippo

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am to 5:30pm.

The Pre-Symposium Workshop for Department Chairs is an opportunity for all department chairs (experienced and inexperienced) to improve their understanding of their duties and their ability to perform them. Participants should also include those interested in becoming department chairs. Four experienced former department chairs will serve as resources for the group as the participants review and discuss the duties of the department chair and explore ways that chairs can do their jobs efficiently and effectively. Some specific discussion topics will include leadership styles, time management, legal issues, academic program assessment, and faculty promotion and tenure.

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Microsoft Research's Project Hawaii is an academic outreach and research dissemination project. The academic goal of Hawaii is to enable graduate and undergraduate university students to gain understanding and expertise in developing cloud-enabled mobile applications using the Microsoft Mobile and Cloud infrastructure. Project Hawaii is a collection of cloud services, hosted in Windows Azure; a Visual Studio 2010 based development SDK and sample application code; a community forum for exchange of ideas; and, mobile platform hardware (Windows Phone 7). Project Hawaii started in Spring 2010 when it was offered as a pilot project in USC, Duke and Wisconsin-Madison. In Fall 2010 Project Hawaii was offered in MSU, CMU, Michigan, Maryland, Arkansas, UCSB and Singapore Management U. Its third offering would be in Spring 2011 in more than 15 schools internationally. Prominent among the Spring 2011 schools are Stanford, UCSB, Purdue, University College London; to name a few.

In this session Project Hawaii team will provide an overview of the project, with an emphasis on its use as a project companion for teaching mobile and cloud computing courses. Instructors who have been associated with Project Hawaii will be invited to talk about their experiences using Hawaii as a course companion for teaching cloud-enabled mobile computing courses to graduate and undergraduate computer science and engineering students. Demonstrations of projects by students using Hawaii will be featured in the demo session.

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 11:00am - 5:30pm

This pre-conference workshop will bring together faculty to discuss innovative approaches to introducing computer science using novel problem domains. The innovation may be primarily through pedagogy. For example, an instructor may use problem-based learning to build a course around real, domain-specific problems and the techniques necessary to solve them, rather than addressing a list of topics. Alternatively, a novel approach may address a new context such as the modeling and analysis of social networks. The workshop will address approaches that seek to change the culture and practice of computer science by addressing the pipeline at its early stages, specifically in introductory college courses in computer science, mathematics, statistics, and the social and natural sciences.

More information at http://harambeenet.org/sigcse11

Organizers and affiliations:

  • Jeff Forbes, Duke University -
  • Owen Astrachan, Duke University -

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am - 5:30pm

Women in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) face particular challenges in pursuing and maintaining academic careers at primarily undergraduate academic institutions. Women academicians in CSE typically have few female colleagues to provide critical information about the culture and content required for successful academic careers. To help this situation, the Computing Research Association Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRA-W) will sponsor a career/mentoring workshop titled "Managing the Academic Career for Women Faculty in Undergraduate Computing Programs". The day-long workshop, to be held on Wednesday, March 9, will be co-located with the SIGCSE 2011 conference in Dallas. The goal of the workshop is to provide critical mentoring information for women at all career levels in undergraduate teaching. The target audiences of the workshop are pre-tenure faculty and graduate students in Computer Science and Engineering who are interested in an academic career, as well as post-tenure (senior) faculty seeking to improve their teaching and mentoring skills.

More information at http://cra-w.org/ArticleDetails/tabid/77/ArticleID/75/Default.aspx

  • Susan Rodger, Duke University -
  • Sheila Castaneda, Clarke University -

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 1:00pm - 5:30pm

When registering, this event is available as a single choice or as a combo with another half-day event.

New to teaching? Seeking advice and mentorship? Join us at the New Educators Roundtable (NER), a half-day workshop designed to mentor college and university faculty who are new to teaching. We welcome participants from across the entire teaching spectrum: tenure-track faculty at institutions where teaching is central, teaching-track faculty and lecturers, and graduate students who currently teach or are looking forward to an academic career. Come with your questions and concerns, learn from the experiences and best practices of sage elders, and build an international support group for your career.

More information at http://dave-reed.com/NER

  • Julie Zelenski, Stanford University
  • David Reed, Creighton University

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am - 12:00pm

When registering, this event is available as a single choice or as a combo with another half-day event.

This open meeting of ACM's Special Interest Group on Computers and Society (SIGCAS) is an opportunity for SIGCAS members and supporters to provide input into the future direction of the SIG. Particular attention will be paid to issues of interest to SIGCAS members who are primarily computer science educators.

Organizers and affiliations: SIGCAS, Florence Appel, Saint Xavier University

This event is full.
Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am to 5:30pm

More information at http://www.programbydesign.org/events/sigcse2011

Want to create excitement without sacrificing principles or losing a clear connection to mainstream CS? Check out Program by Design, which is what TeachScheme! has grown up to become. See how you can program animations, the Web, and mobile phone apps from week 1; learn about the smooth transition to Java; and acquaint yourself with the middle-school component, used in inner-city after-school programs nationwide. This one-day workshop gives a detailed overview of the high-school/college curriculum, including the path to Java. A late-afternoon session includes demos of different assignments, discussion of the middle-school program, and a chance to interact with current users of the curriculum.

Contact: Viera Proulx,

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am - 5:30pm

This workshop is intended for teachers who have little or no experience in teaching with Alice. The workshop will provide hands-on experience with learning to use Alice 2.2 and in learning to teach with Alice. Alice 2.2 is a powerful program visualization environment where students are engaged in building virtual worlds to create animations and simple games. Instructional materials, software, and a complimentary copy of the 3rd edition of the text, Learning to Program with Alice, will be provided to each participant.

More information at http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/wpdann/workshops.html

Contact: Wanda Dann, Carnegie-Mellon University

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am - 5:30pm

This workshop is designed for instructors of CS1/AP who are interested in providing a gentle introduction to programming concepts in Alice 3 integral with mediating the transfer of these concepts into Java. The workshop will introduce Alice 3 and a plugin for transitioning from Alice to Java. Alice 3 builds on Alice 2's powerful program visualization technique, enabling students to "see" objects and work with object-oriented programming. Participants will learn how to use Alice 3 to build virtual worlds and how to use this approach in CS1 courses (introductory programming for majors and non-majors and AP CS).

More information at http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/wpdann/workshops.html

Contact: Wanda Dann, Carnegie-Mellon University

This event is full.

When registering, this event is available as a single choice or as a combo with another half-day event.

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 1:15pm to 5:30pm

In support of ACM's Commitment to Ethical Professionalism this event is designed to help interested faculty provide students with tools to better understand and resolve the ethical challenges in their professional lives we will present well developed examples and modules which can be used to engage students in the study of applied ethics. We will present materials to be used in a complete computer ethics course and that can be used as examples and exercises in specific technical courses; including case studies, suggested course syllabi, and suggestions for creating and grading assignments.

More information at https://edocs.uis.edu/kmill2/www/sigcse2011computerEthics.html

Organizers and affiliations:

  • Bo Brinkman, Miami University (Ohio)
  • Don Gotterbarn, East Tennessee State University -
  • Keith Miller, University of Illinois Springfield
Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 8:00am - 5:30pm

The Third annual HFOSS Education Symposium (HFOSS 2011), held as a SIGCSE 2011 pre-conference activity (March 9th 2011, Dallas, Texas), aims to bring together educators, software developers, industry representatives, and students to continue the discussion of how best to promote HFOSS within undergraduate computing education. Humanitarian FOSS is free and open source software that contributes in some way to the public good. This year's symposium focuses on applying HFOSS within the local community -- i.e., in local government, in K-12 education, and in collaboration with local non-profit organizations. This years keynote speaker is Bryan Sivak, Chief Technology Officer for the District of Columbia, founding member and advisory board member of Civic Commons. As in previous years, the symposium will be highly interactive, taking place entirely in plenary sessions. In addition to the keynote address by Bryan Sivak, the symposium will include a poster session, and panels on government, K-12 education, and non-profits, made up of invited speakers and participants from industry, academia, and the non-profit sector.

For more information and registration visit http://www.hfoss.org/hfoss2011

Organizers and affiliations:

  • Ralph Morelli (chair), Trinity College
  • Trishan de Lanerolle, Trinity College
  • Danny Krizanc, Wesleyan University
  • Norman Danner, Wesleyan University
  • Gary Parker, Connecticut College
  • Ozgur Izmirli, Connecticut College
  • Carlos Espinosa, Trinity College
  • Allen Tucker, Bowdoin College


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